Patient-Centered Care – Health Care
Tag

Patient-Centered Care

Browsing

As we wait for final rules that will enable consumers to freely access their health data, electronic health record (EHR) giant Epic is saying breaking down the silos where this information lives will create a privacy hazard for patients.

While privacy concerns over health data sharing are always legitimate, they can’t stem the tide of the inevitable: Patients and consumers are demanding access to their data, and new proposed government rules supporting a consumer-directed, seamless flow of medical information will likely go into effect as soon as this month.

When they do, it will accelerate the race among technology companies to offer consumers the end-to-end healthcare experience and outcomes we’ve all been missing. At the same time, they will force the government to move quickly to establish a new privacy framework that will replace HIPAA’s limited reach and work to benefit all stakeholders.

Case Study

Across-the-Board Impact of an OB-GYN Hospitalist Program

A Denver facility saw across-the-board improvements in patient satisfaction, maternal quality metrics, decreased subsidy and increased service volume, thanks to the rollout of the first OB-GYN hospitalist program in the state.

See how

We could be in for a wild ride. But when the dust settles, we will have what we should have had all along: a healthcare system where consumers sit at the center and are empowered by ownership of their own health data.

A snapshot of health IT’s bumpy history

In 2004, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT released a framework for strategic action, the decade of health information technology: delivering consumer-centric and information-rich care (PDF).

I worked for David Brailer at the time, who was appointed by President George W. Bush to be the country’s first information “czar” for healthcare. Dr. Brailer is still an advocate for information-sharing, recently calling on healthcare CEOs to lean into, not away from, the opportunity to engage the patient in a more meaningful way. If healthcare CEOs fall short, tech companies will fill the void (more on that later). 

We envisioned a system where important health data would follow the individual by building interoperability into EHRs from the start—a vision that tragically has yet to be realized. 

ELATED: Epic’s Judy Faulkner: ONC data blocking rule undermines privacy, intellectual property protections

We imagined health data would function as a powerful currency for consumers, but to date, this valuable asset has stayed in the hands of EHR companies who keep it under lock and key. 

Consumers will soon hold this currency in their hands for the first time. If they seek to understand and apply their health data like they have with their genetic information—consider the explosion of tech companies like 23andMe and others—we’ll see dramatic shifts in the health tech landscape.

Consumers are most likely to share their health information with companies that have proven they can offer a powerful, secure and user-friendly experience: companies like Amazon, Apple, Google and a host of established and emerging technology players.

We must now endeavor to build the necessary security and privacy frameworks that ensure the consumer will always be protected and in control of their personal health information.

Where to go from here

We’re entering a new era, one where healthcare providers, payers, solutions providers and technology companies will create a superior healthcare experience and deliver improved patient outcomes.

The days of medical information being walled off and guarded by EHR vendors are coming to an end.

We can expect three things to occur once the rules are finalized:

  •  EHR companies will see their business models disrupted: As consumers control their health data, the silos created by EHR companies will gradually erode. This will change these companies’ business models permanently. No longer the central gatekeepers of the country’s medical information, EHR companies will scramble to build new capabilities and services in a bid to remain important players in healthcare.
  • Technology companies that build trust will earn their moment in the sun: Consumers have shown a willingness to share sensitive information with technology companies in exchange for insights about their health. With new rules in place that turn loose volumes of health data, incumbent tech giants and newcomers will compete to create compelling new healthcare experiences and superior outcomes. Consumers will decide the winners by preferentially sharing their data with companies whose products and services are both transparent and secure.
  • New privacy laws must take shape: As tech companies compete to win the trust of consumers, the government will develop updated rules of the road for our new, consumer-centric health system. This effort is already underway thanks to multi-stakeholder groups like the CARIN Alliance and the work that the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is doing with Manatt. We can expect these efforts to ramp up quickly.

HIPAA doesn’t cover many of the new digital products and services that can benefit consumers, but that doesn’t mean consumers and technology companies cannot hold this data. It means we need to modernize HIPAA.

When these trends come to pass, it will be the consumer—newly empowered with their health data—who will drive our country toward value-based care. Top-down decisions by healthcare providers, insurers and government agencies haven’t accomplished this vision—consumers can and will.

As a consumer, a health tech entrepreneur, a mother and a former federal and state official, I am eager to bear witness as consumers take the driver’s seat, which was the intention all along.

Lori Evans Bernstein is a co-founder and the president and chief operating officer of HealthReveal. She was a senior advisor to the first National Coordinator for Health IT in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and served as deputy commissioner of the New York State Department of Health’s Office of Health IT Transformation. 

The University of California, Irvine, will start construction this month on its new nine-acre campus that it says will be a national showcase for integrative medicine.

UCI will start construction on the $185 million Samueli College of Health Science complex, which will incorporate the university’s medical school.

The site, adjacent to the UCI Research Park, will include a state-of-the-art, five-story building that will house the Susan and Henry Samueli College of Health Sciences and an adjoining four-story building for the Sue and Bill Gross School of Nursing, the university said in an announcement.

Case Study

Across-the-Board Impact of an OB-GYN Hospitalist Program

A Denver facility saw across-the-board improvements in patient satisfaction, maternal quality metrics, decreased subsidy and increased service volume, thanks to the rollout of the first OB-GYN hospitalist program in the state.

See how

“UCI is creating a national model for integrative health teaching, research, and delivery,” UCI Chancellor Howard Gillman said in the announcement. “These two new buildings, part of our expanded health sciences campus, will ensure that our dedicated researchers and clinicians set a standard that, over time, other medical centers in the U.S. can follow.”

The construction is made possible in part by a $200 million gift made in 2017 by billionaires Susan and Henry Samueli—the largest gift in the school’s history—to launch the new health center dedicated to integrative medicine.

Critics, however, jumped on the donation used to name a first-of-its-kind College of Health Sciences to promote alternative therapies. Those critics said it’s another slide down the slippery slope that allows unproven therapies into mainstream medicine and lends legitimacy to invalid practices.

At the time, physicians at UC Irvine said medical schools are too slow to adopt new approaches, including alternative therapies.

The school said the new College of Health Sciences is the first university-based health sciences enterprise to incorporate integrative health research, teaching and patient care across its schools and programs. Integrative health considers the factors that influence health, wellness and disease, including mind, body and spirit and makes use of appropriate preventatives, therapeutic and lifestyle approaches, the school said.

“Optimal health and healing come from taking an integrative approach to healthcare that is patient-centered, science-based, transdisciplinary and team-delivered,” Steve Goldstein, M.D., vice chancellor for health affairs, said in the announcement.

“Moving from the status quo to improved care for our population requires an expanded focus to promote health and well-being and more effectively deliver healthcare using all evidence-based approaches across the lifespan. This health sciences complex will be at the epicenter of the transformation of the current healthcare system, as well as a site for research and the training of the next generation of healthcare professionals,” Goldstein said.

The construction will include a 150-seat auditorium, a central courtyard that connects with the Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, landscape design elements that support activities such as yoga and tai chi, a Zen garden, and a 600-foot-long wellness walk that leads to the School of Medicine’s Biomedical Research Center, the university said.

In addition, the health sciences building will house the Susan Samueli Integrative Health Institute. The project also includes a pad for a proposed School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences building. There are also plans to create a School of Population Health, currently the university’s program in public health.

The project is also supported by a gift from the William and Sue Gross Family Foundation, which in 2016 committed $40 million to UCI to establish a nursing school and assist in the construction of a new building to house it.