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After 50 years of research and the testing of over 1,000 drugs, there is new hope for preserving brain cells for a time after stroke. Treating acute ischemic stroke patients with an experimental neuroprotective drug, combined with a surgical procedure to remove the clot improves outcomes as shown by clinical trial results published today in The Lancet.

The multi-center, double-blinded, randomized trial, led by a team at the Cumming School of Medicine's (CSM) Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Alberta Health Services, investigates the use of the neuroprotective drug nerinetide, developed by NoNO Inc, in two scenarios in the same trial. In one scenario, nerinetide is given to patients in addition to the clot-busting drug alteplase. In the second scenario, patients who were not suitable for alteplase received only nerinetide. Both groups of patients had concurrent endovascular treatment (EVT) to remove the clot.

"Compared to placebo, almost 20 per cent more patients who received nerinetide along with endovascular treatment, but did not receive alteplase, recovered from a devastating stroke – a difference between paralysis and walking out of the hospital," says Dr. Michael Hill, MD, a neurologist at Foothills Medical Centre (FMC) and professor in the departments of Clinical Neurosciences and Radiology at the CSM. "In the patients who received both drugs, the alteplase negated the benefits of the nerinetide."

Hill says the study provides evidence of a biological pathway that protects brain cells from dying when they are deprived of blood flow. Nerinetide targets the final stage of the brain cell's life by stopping the production of nitric oxide within the cell.

"We really believe this is a new scientific observation," says Hill. "There is evidence nerinetide promotes brain cell survival, offering neuroprotection until we can extract the clot. It opens the door to a new way of treating stroke."

Images of patients' brains from the study show the expected size of the damage from the stroke is sizeably reduced when nerinetide is administered and EVT is performed among patients not concurrently receiving alteplase.

After so many studies investigating neuroprotective drugs failed, we are extremely excited by these results. While nerinetide is not approved for use yet, it shows the potential of a new tool to promote recovery from stroke."

Dr. Mayank Goyal, MD, PhD, neuroradiologist at the FMC, and clinical professor in the Department of Radiology at the CSM

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Worldwide, 15 million people suffer a stroke each year – that's one every nine minutes in Canada and every 90 seconds in the United States. The results can be devastating. Ischemic stroke, the most common, is caused by a clot in a blood vessel in the brain. The sudden loss of blood flow causes brain cells to die, which can permanently affect speech, vision, balance and movement.

The international trial enrolled 1,105 patients between March 2017 and August 2019 at centres in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia – a global academic collaboration bringing together scientists, clinicians, funding agencies, and industry.

"The collaboration between NoNO Inc., the University of Calgary and investigators at 48 leading stroke hospitals around the world has shown how effective such an academic-industry partnership can be in running high-quality, foundational stroke trials that can lead to positive changes in clinical practice," says Dr. Michael Tymianski, MD, PhD, CEO of NoNO Inc. and the inventor of nerinetide.

The results in the current study, called the ESCAPE-NA1 Trial, build on the success of the ESCAPE trial, in which the Calgary Stroke Program proved that a clot retrieval procedure known as EVT can dramatically improve patient outcomes after an acute ischemic stroke. During the procedure, a catheter is inserted in the groin and guided through blood vessels into the brain. A tiny metal mesh device is used to grab the clot and pull it out. The current study investigates whether administering nerinetide in addition to clot retrieval improves the patient's ability to recover.

Source:

University of Calgary

Journal reference:

Hill, M.D, et al. (2020) Efficacy and safety of nerinetide for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke (ESCAPE-NA1): a multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial. The Lancet. doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30258-0.

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey shows administering the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab together with chemotherapy given at the same time as radiation treatment (chemoradiation) is safe and tolerable as a first-line therapy for patients with stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The work, stemming from a multi-center phase 1 clinical trial led by Rutgers Cancer Institute, is published in the February 20 online edition of JAMA Oncology.

“Locally advanced NSCLC accounts for 20 to 25 percent of all new diagnoses of NSCLC, with five-year overall survival rates of between 25 to 30 percent when standard therapy is given. Current standard treatment in which an immunotherapy drug is administered after chemoradiaton offers a 57 percent progression-free survival rate compared to 43.5 percent when chemoradiation is given alone. Our team wanted to examine the safety and tolerability of the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab when administered concurrently with chemoradiation, as we’ve learned from first-line treatment of stage 4 disease that we see better patient outcomes the earlier immunotherapy is given,” shares Rutgers Cancer Institute radiation oncologist Salma Jabbour, MD, who is the lead and corresponding author of the current work.

Typically, the human body’s immune system recognizes abnormal cells in the body and destroys them. Cancer cells frequently create proteins (PD-L1, programmed cell death ligand-1) on the cell surface that act as signals to turn off this part of the immune system. Pembrolizumab is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat melanoma and other forms of cancer that targets PD-1 receptors, which act as a signaling ‘switch.’ Pembrolizumab blocks this action and turns the ‘switch’ back on, allowing the immune system to recognize cancer cells as foreign and attack them.

For a 27 month period between 2016 and 2018, 23 participants were enrolled (52 percent were women; median age 69 years). Five cohorts evaluating different timing and dosing of pembrolizumab combined with chemotherapy (carboplatin and paclitaxel weekly) and definitive radiation therapy (60 Gy in 2 Gy/day x 30 fractions) for unresectable, locally advanced, stage 3 disease were examined. Median follow-up time was 16 months.

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Results show the combined treatment is feasible and well tolerated with a 12-month progression-free survival of 69.7 percent. Clinical benefit accounted for 94.6 percent at a median of 12.6 months. Of 19 evaluable patients (those who received 2 or more cycles of pembrolizumab) for response, the best response to therapy was a partial response seen in 73.7 percent, followed by 15.8 percent with a complete response, and 5.3 percent with stable disease. Local progression occurred in one patient, and of the six who developed metastatic disease, the median time to metastatic disease was 14.7 months. While there was an increased rate of pneumonitis, the authors note that patients with this form of lung inflammation responded to high-dose steroid treatment.

This study demonstrates that the combination of immunotherapy with chemoradiation has the potential to improve cure rates for patients with stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer.”

Dr. Salma Jabbour, professor of radiation oncology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Given the risk of pneumonitis when pembrolizumab is given with chemoradiation, the authors note further evaluation of the treatment combination through clinical trials is warranted, where careful radiation design to limit key lung parameters and biomarkers can be implemented. They add study limitations include the small sample size and limited follow-up duration.

Source:

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Journal reference:

Jabbour, S.K, et al. (2020) Phase 1 Trial of Pembrolizumab Administered Concurrently With Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer. JAMA Oncology. doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2019.6731.

When you're facing a cancer diagnosis with an average survival span of 12 to 18 months, every milestone is a victory. That makes each wedding invitation, graduation announcement and birthday photo that UCI neuro-oncologist Dr. Daniela Bota receives from her patients a cherished validation of her 12 years of groundbreaking research on glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive form of brain cancer. "Because of our work, these people have been able to move on with their lives," she says.

Bota has pushed the boundaries of innovation in her quest to increase the survival rates of individuals with brain tumors, especially glioblastomas. The esteemed physician-scientist has taken a truly comprehensive approach to battling this rare disease, which has a five year survival rate of only 10 percent and claimed the lives of U.S. Sens. Ted Kennedy and John McCain. Bota has conducted clinical trials of multiple cutting-edge treatments that are improving the quantity as well as the quality of life for glioblastoma patients at UCI and beyond.

'So much potential, so much growth'

Bota grew up in Romania, in a family of engineers. It was assumed she'd follow them into the profession – she was a national mathematics champion in her youth – but Bota had another path in mind. "I wanted to make a more significant contribution," she says. "I wanted to combine my analytical side with a place where I could help others. I ended up becoming an M.D.-Ph.D. to blend both."

At USC, Bota earned a doctorate in molecular biology, focusing on neural degeneration. She then went to the University of Kansas for medical school and a residency in neurology. During her shifts, Bota found herself caring for people with brain tumors – and discovered a new direction for her medical career.

The generosity and gratitude of brain tumor patients make it so rewarding to care for them. I see it again and again at UCI. Many of these patients have a terminal diagnosis, but they're volunteering their time and energy to participate in our clinical trials to help us build a better treatment and, hopefully, in the future, a cure."

Dr. Daniela Bota, UCI neuro-oncologist

After a neuro-oncology fellowship at Duke University, Bota joined the faculty of UCI's School of Medicine and the Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center in November 2007. "Both my career and UCI in general have grown so tremendously over the dozen years since," says Bota, who's now co-director of the UCI Health Comprehensive Brain Tumor Program. "There has been so much potential, so much growth, so many changes and so much scientific revolution helping us move forward in so many different directions. It's a very exciting time."

A comprehensive approach

The word "comprehensive" carries significant weight in the realm of cancer care centers. The "comprehensive" designation from the National Cancer Institute recognizes an added depth and breadth of research that bridges multiple scientific areas. Just 51 cancer centers in the U.S. carry the designation; the Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center is the only one in Orange County. "We offer one of the most innovative and complex portfolios of clinical trials anywhere in the world," Bota says.

Her own multipronged attack against glioblastoma multiforme reflects the center's comprehensive approach. Bota's work on the experimental drug marizomib has generated significant attention and hope. Unlike traditional chemotherapy drugs, marizomib can penetrate the blood-brain barrier – the filtering mechanism that prevents many blood-borne substances from passing into brain tissues – and inhibit cancer growth without causing damage to other parts of the brain.

Over the past 12 years, Bota has shepherded marizomib from preclinical development all the way through a 700-person international phase III clinical trial now underway. "We have a number of patients from our clinical trials who are surviving this tumor for longer periods of time than usually expected," she says.

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Amanda Johnson, a 32-year-old freelance writer in Mission Viejo, has been receiving marizomib for two years under Bota's care. Her large glioblastoma tumor – which straddled both sides of her brain – has shrunk so much that it's no longer measurable. She has returned to work on her novel and even joined a gym. "I feel so happy just to be alive," Johnson says.

Larry Johnson, her father, told Fox News, "I don't think [Amanda] has come to realize how important her survival is to other people and families who are going to find themselves in a similar situation."

Bota strives to reach a point where such cases will be so commonplace that they don't make the news. "That's what success looks like – not having a prominent publication or being part of a game-changing discovery," she says. "It's having patients like Amanda still be here and doing well."

Vaccine trials and right to try

To achieve that goal, Bota tenaciously pursues multiple avenues of treatment. She has been a leader in the use of Optune, a device worn on the head that generates an electrical field that disrupts the growth of cancer cells. "We were among the first in the country to explore and use this technology," Bota says. "Now we're working with physicians from other countries to help them adopt it in their practices."

She is also spearheading two clinical trials on cancer vaccines. "Brain tumors hide behind the blood-brain barrier, so the body doesn't recognize them as not being a normal part of the body," Bota explains. "With our vaccines, we extract cellular markers from the patient's tumor and inject them back into the patient to stimulate the immune system to recognize those tumors, attack them and, if possible, eliminate them."

She adds: "Both studies have been well-received in our neuro-oncological community, which is highly promising. And a significant benefit is that the vaccines function with minimal or no toxicity."

In January 2019, one of Bota's patients who was ineligible for both clinical trials was able to access one of the vaccines through the first successful application of the national Right to Try Act. Passed in May 2018, it allows people with terminal illnesses, in consultation with their doctors, to seek treatment with experimental drugs not yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration directly from pharmaceutical companies. "The law puts patients in charge of their care; they initiate contact with the manufacturer and request therapy," Bota says. "It gives patients who don't qualify for clinical trials another option."

"We offer one of the most innovative and complex portfolios of clinical trials anywhere in the world."

Sharing her expertise

Bota eagerly offers her knowledge beyond the doors of the Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. Whenever she and her husband, Robert, a local psychiatrist, travel back to their home country of Romania, she consults with medical colleagues there, as there are no certified neuro-oncologists in the nation. On days when the couple work on their farm in the Transylvanian Alps, locals come to them – often on foot – for medical advice. The two hope to eventually establish a clinic in the area. "I want to make sure that Romania also benefits from my medical expertise," Bota says.

Back on campus, in her capacity as senior associate dean for clinical research, she uses her vast clinical trial experience to help colleagues in UCI's School of Medicine advance their own research projects into the clinical arena.

"I'm excited by the ability to impact the lives of so many people through this role," Bota says. "Whether it's for burns or vascular disorders or other conditions, people come to UCI for the same reason: We can offer what community hospitals cannot. Being able to make that happen, to create new options for our patients, is what wakes me up in the morning."

Source:

University of California, Irvine